How americans utilize the right to vote as a means of giving their consent to government actions

Introduction One of the most critical ways that individuals can influence governmental decision-making is through voting. Voting is a formal expression of preference for a candidate for office or for a proposed resolution of an issue.

How americans utilize the right to vote as a means of giving their consent to government actions

But when he and some other black ex-servicemen attempted to vote, a white mob stopped them. Now, after the Germans and Japanese hadn't killed us, it looked as though the white Mississippians would. Without this right, people can be easily ignored and even abused by their government. Despite the 14th and 15th amendments guaranteeing the civil rights of black Americans, their right to vote was systematically taken away by white supremacist state governments.

Inthe Radical Republicans in Congress imposed federal military rule over most of the South. Army occupation, the former Confederate states wrote new constitutions and were readmitted to the Union, but only after ratifying the 14th Amendment.

This Reconstruction amendment prohibited states from denying "the equal protection of the laws" to U. Inthe 15th Amendment was ratified. It stated that, "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

For the most part, these new black voters cast their ballots solidly for the Republican Party, the party of the Great Emancipator, Abraham Lincoln. When Mississippi rejoined the Union informer slaves made up more than half of that state's population.

During the next decade, Mississippi sent two black U. But even though the new black citizens voted freely and in large numbers, whites were still elected to a large majority of state and local offices.

This was the pattern in most of the Southern states during Reconstruction. The Republican-controlled state governments in the South were hardly perfect.

Many citizens complained about overtaxation and outright corruption. But these governments brought about significant improvements in the lives of the former slaves. For the first time, black men and women enjoyed freedom of speech and movement, the right of a fair trial, education for their children, and all the other privileges and protections of American citizenship.

But all this changed when Reconstruction ended in and federal troops withdrew from the old Confederacy. Voting in Mississippi With federal troops no longer present to protect the rights of black citizens, white supremacy quickly returned to the old Confederate states.

Black voting fell off sharply in most areas because of threats by white employers and violence from the Ku Klux Klan, a ruthless secret organization bent on preserving white supremacy at all costs.

White majorities began to vote out the Republicans and replace them with Democratic governors, legislators, and local officials. Laws were soon passed banning interracial marriages and racially segregating railroad cars along with the public schools.

Laws and practices were also put in place to make sure blacks would never again freely participate in elections.

But one problem stood in the way of denying African Americans the right to vote: To a great extent, Mississippi led the way in overcoming the barrier presented by the 15th Amendment.

How americans utilize the right to vote as a means of giving their consent to government actions

InMississippi held a convention to write a new state constitution to replace the one in force since Reconstruction. The white leaders of the convention were clear about their intentions. Because of the 15th Amendment, they could not ban blacks from voting.Subsequent acts of Congress, court decisions, and state actions to retrocede jurisdiction back to the Federal Government have muted some of the effects of the law, and strengthened the tribes’ jurisdiction over civil and criminal matters on their reservations.

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. Section 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Dec 23,  · Watch video · The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution granted American women the right to vote, a right known as women’s suffrage, and was ratified on August 18, , ending almost a century of protest.

One of the most important rights of American citizens is the franchise — the right to vote.

The Rights and Freedoms of Americans

Originally under the Constitution, only white male citizens over the age of 21 were eligible to vote. At the same time, the overall voting rate fell to historic lows in this period, and, today, some American citizens are still without voting rights while many more face new restrictions or unnecessary challenges in exercising their right to vote.

% would give up the right to vote in all elections for life — and % would give up their child’s or future child’s right to vote in all elections for life. % would give up Social Security benefits for the next two years.

Native American civil rights - Wikipedia