Muscle and flexibility

Stretching may take a back seat to your exercise routine.

Muscle and flexibility

Muscle and flexibility

According to Gummerson, flexibility he uses the term mobility is affected by the following factors: Internal influences the type of joint some joints simply aren't meant to be flexible the internal resistance within a joint bony structures which limit movement the elasticity of muscle tissue muscle tissue that is scarred due to a previous injury is not very elastic the elasticity of tendons and ligaments ligaments do not stretch much and tendons should not stretch at all the elasticity of skin skin actually has some degree of elasticity, but not much the ability of a muscle to relax and contract to achieve the greatest range of movement the temperature of the joint and associated tissues joints and muscles offer better flexibility at body temperatures that are 1 to 2 degrees higher than normal External influences the temperature of the place where one is training a warmer temperature is more conducive to increased flexibility the time of day most people are more flexible in the afternoon than in the morning, peaking from about 2: Increased water intake is believed to contribute to increased mobility, as well as increased total body relaxation.

Rather than discuss each of these factors in significant detail as Gummerson does, I will attempt to focus on some of the more common factors which limit one's flexibility. According to SynerStretchthe most common factors are: Depending on the type of joint involved and its present condition is it healthy?

Muscle and flexibility

This is a common way in which age can be a factor limiting flexibility since older joints tend not to be as healthy as younger ones. Muscle mass can be a factor when the muscle is so heavily developed that it interferes with the ability to take the adjacent joints through their complete range of motion for example, large hamstrings limit the ability to fully bend the knees.

Excess fatty tissue imposes a similar restriction. The majority of "flexibility" work should involve performing exercises designed to reduce the internal resistance offered by soft connective tissues see section Connective Tissue.

Most stretching exercises attempt to accomplish this goal and can be performed by almost anyone, regardless of age or gender.Oct 16,  · Isometric stretching is a type of static stretching (meaning it does not use motion) which involves the resistance of muscle groups through isometric contractions (tensing) of the stretched muscles.

The use of isometric stretching is one of the fastest ways to develop increased static-passive flexibility and is much more effective than either Author: Doug Lawrenson. Could strength training decrease flexibility--yes. Does strength training have to decrease flexibility--absolutely not.

Strength training may have a tendency to cause the muscles to feel tighter that is why it is very important to have a proper stretching and flexibility routine incorporated in your strength training.

muscle activation of the lower and upper rectus abdominals relative to disc compression (load) when compared with a variety of sit-ups. Few results are available on the consistency and accuracy of the curl-up.

Reliability is higher for col- Muscular Strength, Endurance, and Flexibility. Curl-Up. Active flexibility is harder to develop than passive flexibility (which is what most people think of as "flexibility"); not only does active flexibility require passive flexibility in order to assume an initial extended position, it also requires muscle strength to be able to hold and maintain that position.

Oct 06,  · You see, the flexibility of a muscle is very dependent on the strength of that muscle: Especially strength at the end ranges of motion. It’s like your body won’t let you go past a certain level of flexibility until it knows you have the muscle strength to handle that improved range of motion.5/5.

Oct 16,  · Isometric stretching is a type of static stretching (meaning it does not use motion) which involves the resistance of muscle groups through isometric contractions (tensing) of the stretched muscles. The use of isometric stretching is one of the fastest ways to develop increased static-passive flexibility and is much more effective than either Author: Doug Lawrenson.

Flexibility (anatomy) - Wikipedia